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Archive for Elements of Composition

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How to Add Depth and Dimension to Your Photographs

In a recent New Mexico photography workshop we went over several tips on how to add depth and dimension to photographs. In this short podcast I share ways in which you can move past taking flat images.

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Beyond the Rule of Thirds: Grid of Dynamic Symmetry

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In this short video series I go over some of the basics of adding depth to a photograph using composition and geometry.

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As photographers, we often hear about the importance of using perspective when capturing images, but what does this actually mean?

First of all, perspective isn't something that can be changed by changing your lens. Perspective can only be changed through a shifting of the photographer's physical position. This does not just mean moving in closer or further away from your subject, but also moving in a vertical plane, shooting from above, or getting down low. In this video, I go over the basics of using perspective as part of your compositional vocabulary:

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Developing a Compositional Vocabulary in Photography – Part Two B: “Simplicity” BONUS VIDEO

Part One: “Seeing”
Part Two A: “Simplicity A”
Part Two B: “Simplicity B”
Part Three: "Perspective"

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Painters start with a blank canvas and then add the essential elements to their paintings. Photography is the direct opposite of this, as photographers need to remove all the nonessential information from the frame. In this second video in my series on Developing a Compositional Vocabulary in Photography, I discuss the power of employing simplicity when framing an image, including only the essential information and objects that lend power to the main subject.

Part One: “Seeing”
Part Two A: “Simplicity A”
Part Two B: “Simplicity B”
Part Three: "Perspective"

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In this video series I discuss the essential compositional elements needed to begin creating more powerful images. “Seeing” is the first step in the photographic process. People often fixate on a subject that first captures their attention, while ignoring all the surroundings that are essential to “building” a captivating photograph.

“Looking” is not the same as “seeing”. You may "look" all over your house for your keys, but you may not “see” them sitting on the kitchen counter. The same thing applies to photography, you may look at the subject, but fail to “see” that telephone pole that is behind them. When you get home excited to begin editing what you thought was a good image, all of a sudden you ask yourself “why didn't I see that pole behind them?”

Part One: “Seeing”
Part Two A: “Simplicity A”
Part Two B: “Simplicity B”
Part Three: "Perspective"

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St. Cinder

Iron Horse Adventure: In Search of Billy the Kid’s Black Hill Hideout

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